Innovators in Big Data coming to Business Analytics Forum at IU’s Kelley School

 

Courtesy: Bosch

By 2020, 25 billion “connected things” will be in use. Graphic courtesy of Bosch.

 

It seems like every new device today is connected to the Internet. A report issued last November by Gartner Inc., the leading IT research and advisory company, said 4.9 billion “connected things” will be in use this year.

The same report said that number would rise to 25 billion by 2020.

For years, we have grown familiar with automated teller machines and airline check-in machines, but new and novel ways for incorporating computing and communications technology have emerged.

There’s the refrigerator that soon will be able to tell you when it’s time to replace the milk and other groceries, and the light bulb you can turn on or off from your mobile phone.

In other words, we’ve come a long way from how we used mundane things that did not have a digital presence.

Several players in this trend will be at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business this week to discuss how their companies are using business analytics to better service consumers and reduce costs.

Business analytics is a key strategic initiative for the Kelley School and it shouldn’t be a surprise that several innovators in the field will be participating in the annual forum, which begins Thursday with a software showcase.

Participants reflect the many ways that analytics are being employed

One of the presenters at Business Analytics Forum 2015, Brent Meyers, a Kelley alumnus who is vice president for customer solutions at FedEx, is expected to discuss how his company uses web-connected devices to track the condition of packages all the way through the process until they arrive at their destinations.

David Miller, seated, center, addresses a question related to his talk last year. To his left is Brent Meyers, Brent Meyers, a Kelley alumnus who is vice president for customer solutions at FedEx and one of this year's presenters.

David Miller, seated, center, addresses a question related to his talk last year. To his left is Brent Meyers, Brent Meyers, a Kelley alumnus who is vice president for customer solutions at FedEx and one of this year’s presenters.

The theme for the program is “Today’s applications and tomorrow’s vision.”

Another speaker, Michael King, director of enterprise business intelligence at Cummins Inc. is expected to touch on how the global leader in diesel engine makers is looking at how web-connected devices might improve safety.

Terry McFadden, principal enterprise information architect at Procter & Gamble, the world’s largest multinational consumer goods company (and home to many Kelley graduates), will talk about the Internet of Things and Big Data, and the necessary relationship between the two.

Gail Bamford, senior industry marketing manager at SAS, the leader in business analytics software and services, will offer perspectives from her more than 25 years of experience in helping leading IT companies develop marketing and sales strategies to address complex problems in government, with a focus on defense and national security agencies.

Other presenters — from companies such as Deloitte Consulting, IBM, 3M, Infosys, Humana and Eli Lilly and Co. — will share expertise in advanced techniques being applied in finance, accounting and marketing, by health care providers, and in government and the military.

More than 100 executives, business researchers, students and others who are on the forefront of applying business analytics in organizations are expected to attend.

The Kelley School’s Institute for Business Analytics presents the event, which in less than three years has a 33-member industry advisory board, including founding partner Deloitte and other supporting partners 3M, SAS, P&G, Allegient, Informatica, IU University Information Technology Services and Protiviti.

Mark Zozulia, a consulting principal at Deloitte Consulting LLP and another IU alumnus

Mark Zozulia, a consulting principal at Deloitte Consulting LLP and another IU alumnus

The keynote speaker will be Mark Zozulia, a consulting principal at Deloitte Consulting LLP and an IU alumnus with more than a quarter century of experience in the analytics and data management fields.

Zozulia has successfully structured and delivered complex business analytics and enterprise information management programs for numerous companies across multiple industries.

Not just about generating revenue

Frank Acito, co-director of the Institute for Business Analytics, said it’s a mistake to only believe that this embrace of business analytics is only meant to enhance company revenues.

“The essence of data is that it can reflect a company’s relationship with its customers, which in turn can be used to generate revenue, as well as help better understand costs and manage risk,” said Acito, also professor of marketing and Max Barney Distinguished Teaching Fellow.

Van Noah, the moderator of a panel, “Integrating Cost and Risk Management: The Role of Analytics,” said that in many non-profit, governmental and military contexts quantifying the relationship between risk and costs is often challenging.

“Risk reduction strategies such as adding capacity, increasing inventory and increasing surveillance all add to costs,” said Noah, who is program director at the Institute for Defense and Business. “Analytics can help assess different dimensions of risk to help make decisions that control or reduce those otherwise rising costs.”

This is the third year for the forum, which will open at 5:30 p.m. Thursday with a presentation featuring six leaders in software development — IBM’s Watson Analytics, Tableau 9, Qlik, SAS JMP, SAS Visual Analytics and Informatica. The conference portion will take place from 8:15 a.m. to 4:20 p.m. on Friday in the Godfrey Executive Education Center, 1275 E. 10th St.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,