‘Beauty Pays,’ according to noted economist who wrote the first book to measure how

By Diane Brown

IU Communications Specialist

 

 

Beauty is only skin deep, but it affects our lives across a large variety of economic dimensions, according to noted economist Daniel S. Hamermesh.

Hamermesh’s “Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful,” published by Princeton University Press in 2011, is the first book to seriously measure the advantages of physical beauty.

On a scale of 1 to 5 — a subjective ranking of the “homely” to the “strikingly attractive,” to use the author’s preferred terms — those in the top third can expect to earn about $200,000 more over their lifetimes than those in the bottom seventh, according to Hamermesh, who will lecture at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis this month.

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Hectic, busy, long hours and IUPUI tourism student can’t wait to do it again

By Rich Schneider

IU Communications Specialist

 

Protestors marched outside. It was organized chaos inside. Security was heavy, with police dogs and heavily armed Secret Service agents. There were long lines. And IUPUI student Tami Cornelius loved every minute of it.

In fact, Cornelius hopes to repeat her experiences at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee policy conference in Washington, D.C., where she served as a volunteer in March. The conference, held annually to help shape U.S. policy and strengthen the U.S.-Israel relationship, drew 16,000 people, throngs of protestors and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who spoke at the conference the day before his controversial speech to Congress on March 3.

Cornelius, a student in the IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, had sought out the experience of working at the large conference held in the seventh-largest convention center in the U.S.

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IUPUI lecturer creating a boogie wonderland outside the NCAA Final Four

By Rich Schneider

IU Communications Specialist

 

IUPUI lecturer C. Thomas Lewis was hard at work April 2, turning the street under a railroad overpass near the site of this weekend’s NCAA Men’s Final Four into an immersive disco environment.

When he and student volunteers assisting him were done, 351 disco balls were suspended from the 360-foot overpass, representing the number of Division I colleges. Theatrical lights bounced off the mirrored surfaces, creating points of light sparkling overhead. A fog machine and a DJ playing disco tunes during peak pedestrian times over the weekend will complete the atmosphere.

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The story at last: The chancellor emeritus was indeed a G-man (Part 2)

By Diane Brown

IU Communications Specialist

 

This is the second of a two-part series: Part 1

 

IUPUI Chancellor Emeritus Gerald L. Bepko and other FBI agents working the 1966 March Against Fear were responsible for identifying Ku Klux Klan members and other troublemakers or would-be assassins, deflecting any violence, and providing daily and hourly reports via teletype to keep President Lyndon B. Johnson advised of march conditions.

Except for the attack on Meredith, the marchers experienced relatively little overt violence during the walk that ended with an estimated 16,000 African American and several hundred white marchers at the statehouse in Jackson, Miss. The march was successful in terms of community organizing and registering thousands to vote.

According to the Milwaukee Journal, “the lack of real violence was probably due to armed Mississippi Highway Patrol officers who assisted city and county law enforcement officers along the way.”

Small-town law enforcement officers reflected the attitudes of their town fathers and local merchants and reacted to the presence of feds such as the FBI agents as “the north invading the south again,” Bepko said.

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The story at last: The chancellor emeritus was indeed a G-man (Part 1)

By Diane Brown

IU Communications Specialist

 

The 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery marches got me thinking about bits and pieces of conversations regarding IUPUI Chancellor Emeritus Gerald L. Bepko  having once been a G-man.

For more than decade I’ve wanted a legitimate opening to question the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor about the details, which I knew had something to do with the civil rights movement.

To my surprise and delight, googling his name recently justified requesting an interview for this blog entry.

“What would people find most surprising about you?” a Chicago-Kent College of Law writer had asked Bepko, in a bio posted two years ago when the school designated Bepko as one of 125 “Alumni of Distinction.” Read more…

Taylor symposium lets you be a witness to Indy’s religious diversity

By Diane Brown

IU Communications Specialist

 

If you didn’t attend the Taylor Symposium this year, or if you want to relive that exhilarating experience, your laptop can take you back.

Thanks to the on-demand video services of Indianapolis Channel 16 Government Access Television, the 26th Joseph T. Taylor Symposium is available for viewing as a three-part series in MP4 video format.

Simply click the blue on-demand button, enter “Joseph Taylor Symposium “in the Search Archives box, then pick from one of three selections from 2015.

Be prepared to go to church, mosque, and/or temple.

This year’s theme was “Encountering Religions Through Performance.” Presented by the School of Liberal Arts under the leadership of the Department of Religious Studies, the event allowed attendees to experience how various religious groups approach “worship and also inform understanding, teaching and celebrating through song, dance and performance,” Dean Bill Blomquist said in his welcome.

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Public health nurse credits Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health for award

By Rich Schneider

IU Communications Specialist

If Jessica Gonzalez Contreras had given an acceptance speech like they do for the Oscars, she knows who she would have thanked when she received a national health award.

Contreras credits her educational experiences at the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis for her Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing Award, created by the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a joint initiative of AARP and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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IUPUI sports management student nominated for ROSE award

By Rich Schneider

IU Communications Specialist

IUPUI sports management student Jessica Bennett looked surprised when a stranger handed her a long-stemmed rose in a glass vase Feb. 25. But this wasn’t a belated Valentine or an episode of “The Bachelor.” It was in honor of her nomination for a ROSE Award from Visit Indy.

Bennett was sitting in the office of David Pierce, an assistant professor in sports management, at the time. Pierce, who nominated her for the award, had asked Bennett to come to his office on the pretense of discussing her plans for the future so he and others — including IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management Dean Jay Gladden — could watch the surprise presentation.

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